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Thread: The Marine Reef Aquarium by Phillip Hunt

  1. #1

    The Marine Reef Aquarium by Phillip Hunt

    I just received this book yesterday from Amazon.

    The reason I started a FW tank again was so that I would feel confident and familiar in the hobby while I put together my first reef tank, an aspect of the hobby that I know little, to nothing about.

    I truly knew less about it than I thought, because this book in the first chapter eloquently describes how naturally occurring reef systems in the wild originate, evolve, expire, and then create new reef systems. This is something that no website or forum (or previously read book) answered for me, Ironic as it were, that the argument against books in the knowledge base of internet resources boasts that the material in said books is out of date or impractical against moddrnization of the industry that encapsulates the hobby.

    This is a phenomenal book, and I am so happy with my purchase, that if anyone else is interested in starting even a Fish Only With Live Rock tank, I highly recommend it.

  2. #2

    Re: The Marine Reef Aquarium by Phillip Hunt

    And i just spent the entirety of my bonus from work on a complete saltwater setup.

  3. #3
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    Re: The Marine Reef Aquarium by Phillip Hunt

    Sounds awesome Tinth. I'll be hitting the amazon tab for this after I post. Have you done much with tropicals before this?

    I had a lot of fun with that hobby as a kid. Had a nice set up when I owned a house too. My dream is to get a big tanks and do like you're talking about. Never did get into saltwater though, a lot of work! I'd thought about becoming an icktheologist as a kid but I my dyslexia stymied following a science track back then.

    Can we look forward to more pics?

    edited to add:
    book ordered and looking forward to it, again thanks.
    Last edited by Aennyil; May 26th, 2016 at 06:13 AM.

  4. #4

    Re: The Marine Reef Aquarium by Phillip Hunt

    I have roughly 6 years experience in the hobby, focusing on almost exclusively heavily planted tanks. I am also of the controversial mindset that does not believe in water changes; I only perform them when first setting up a tank and getting parameters dialed in or something terribly drastic occurs. This happens by having extremely low bioloads stocked mostly with cleanup crews, filter feeders, and excessive filtration, mechanically in addition to biological.

    From what i have learned, making a deep financial investment of initial expenses will create an extremely quick downhill slope if all necessities are considered at a scale that is larger than what it is intended for. This goes for everything from tank size to foods, substrates to plants.

    If you want, say, a tank with a fish that needs a minimum of 25 gallons, go with at least a 30 gallon tank. For whatever reason the fish needs 25, your substrate is going to take up at least a gallon, or maybe even 5. If you go bigger, you accomodate the needs of the fish, for sure.

    If you buy the stand for just a 30 gallon, get something with a big lip, or an extended platform, or at least shelving so that you arent trying to get something with that later, and then have to drain the tank because you need to switch stands later.

    Most FW tanks need the water volume completely turned over at least 3x an hour. So, a 30 gallon needs at least a 90gph rated filter. I prefer instead to have two filters, each rated for at least 50. If one filter fails, the tank wont die while the other continues to run, and the added inlets will encourage a greater amount of consistent water movement.

    Ill come back to this again if you'd like.

  5. #5
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    Re: The Marine Reef Aquarium by Phillip Hunt

    I'm all ears Tinth (well mark 1 eye balls in this case but ... you know <g> )

    A main reason I never got into SW tanks or exotics like Oscars and the bigger cichlids is I never had the money as a kid to buy bigger tanks and the needed gear. I did however manage to breed a fancy guppy in 3 gens from common and was gonna sell it to the local pet shop for good money but never followed through.

    In the late 60's I also brought a species of live bearer similar to guppies but mottled black and silver. The males were vicious critters. I could only keep one alive in a ten gallon tank and had to provide lots of vegetation and hiding for the womenz. He'd rape them (like most live bearers do) and then bite their tails. Bastard even attacked my blue gourami who was king of my main tank.

    Only thing he never bothered was the hippy catfish or my khuli loach.

    In my fish bible of the day (can't remember the name of it but it was one of two tropical books commonly available at the time) said it was imported to Fl from Mexico to help eat mosquitos and etc. They did an awesome job too, never got bit at Alexander Springs where I got them. (Probably illegally but I think the Ranger liked my dad and so turned a blind eye.)

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